Item Quality

Items come in a variety of qualities which determine their price and sturdiness in combat. Quality degrades over time and from suffering too many wounds and injuries. Quality also determines the weight of certain things, with bulkier low-quality goods and more refined high-quality goods.

Weapons
Weapon Qualities from Worst to Best:

  • Cracked – Cracked Weapons are splintered, broken, or severely worn-through. They deal half damage from a weapon, and break completely if you fail an attack by more than 1 degree of failure. A cracked weapon with a Penetration rating is reduced to having 0 Penetration on armor and 1 penetration on bare flesh. Cracked weapons do not add the SB to their damage. Cracked weapons aren’t worth repairing.
    Price: Base Cost – 1/2.
    Weight: – 1/2 Base
  • Chipped – Chipped Weapons are breaking, splintering and are in need of repair. They deal normal damage with a -1 added penalty to damage and it’s Penetration rating is reduced by 2 (min 0) on armor and reduced by 1 on bare flesh. Chipped weapons deal 1/2 their SB in damage if applicable. If you fail an attack by 3 degrees of failure or more, the Chipped Weapon degenerates into a Cracked Weapon. A chipped weapon can be repaired into a Crude weapon by passing a Challenging Craft check so long as it once was Crude.
    Price: Base Cost – 1/3.
    Weight: – 1/4 base.
  • Rusty – Rusty Weapons are rusty, old, and tarnished. A rusty weapon deals normal damage but has a penalty to it’s Penetration rating, which is reduced by 1, and it’s SB is reduced by 1/2 if applicable. If you fail your attack with a rusty weapon by 4 degrees of success or more, roll a d10. On odds, the weapon becomes Chipped. A rusty weapon can be repaired into a Crude Weapon by passing a Routine Crafting check.
    Price: Base Cost – 1/4.
    Weight: As Base – 1/4
  • Crude – A crude weapon is made by an apprentice or very rudimentary smith. A crude weapon deals normal damage and penetration. If you fail an attack by 4 degrees of success or more roll a d10. On a 9 it is deemed to be of “Rusty” quality, meaning it is in need of minor repairs, on a 10 it is deemed Chipped.
    Price: Base Cost.
    Weight: + 1/4 base.
  • Balanced – Balanced weapons are made by talented or basically skilled craftsmen. A Balanced Weapon has +1 to it’s Penetration rating (If applicable). If you roll a 90-100 on your applicable characteristic (WS or BS) and it is a failure, roll a d10. On a 9 it is deemed Crude and on a 10 it is deemed Rusty. A Balanced weapon can be repaired from any other type of weapon, provided it was once Balanced.
    Price: Base Cost.
    Weight: As Base.
  • Strong – A Strong Weapon was forged by master smiths or skilled craftsmen who cared more about it’s strength than it’s durability. When a character rolls a 10 on their damage, they can roll a 9 and count it as a 10 on their Fury roll to invoke Fury. Any further 9s are considered 9s and do not invoke further Fury. If you roll a 90-100 on your applicable characteristic (WS or BS) and it is a failure, roll a d10. On a 9 it is deemed Crude and on a 10 it is deemed Rusty. A Strong weapon can be repaired from any other type of weapon, provided it was once Strong. It can be reforged into a Balanced or Tempered weapon for an additional +1/4 of cost.
    Price: Base Cost +1/2.
    Weight: + 1/3 base.
  • Tempered – A Tempered weapon was forged by master smiths or skilled craftsmen who knew that it was important for such a weapon to last for ages untarnished. Tempered weapons deal normal damage and penetration. If you roll a 98-100 on your applicable characteristic (WS or BS) and it is a failure, roll a d10. If you roll a 10, it is deemed “Crude”, if you roll anything else the weapon is fine. A Tempered weapon can be repaired from any other type of weapon, provided it was once Tempered. It can be reforged into a Balanced or Strong weapon for an additional +1/4 of cost.
    Price: Base Cost +1/2.
    Weight: + 1/3 base.
  • Masterwork – Masterwork Weapons are a sign of great wealth and prestige. Forged by the greatest of smiths or perhaps even otherworldly hands, a Masterwork weapon is something that is sung of by skalds and illuminated in heroic text. A Masterwork weapon gives +2 to Penetration rating (If applicable), and does an additional +1 to Damage. A Masterwork weapon also increases your Fame by +2 if it was forged for you, or +5 if it was a previously forgotten artifact. A masterwork weapon can become Rusty if it lies unused for ages, but while rusty it can never become Cracked. Repairing a Rusty Weapon that was formerly Masterwork costs 4 times the base cost of the weapon.
    Price: Base Cost x10, Must be done by a Master of the Craft, must be designed and made of rare materials.
    Weight: + 1/4 base.

Armor
Armor Qualities from Worst to Best:

  • Cracked/Tattered – Cracked armor or tattered clothing provides 1/2 (rounded down, Min 0) the armor of the base item and due to holes and cracks, provides no armor when suffering a critical hit do to these weaknesses being exploited. It’s better to just get new armor or clothing than repair these rags.
    Price: 1/4 of the base item.
    Weight: 1/3 base item.
  • Battered/Ragged – Battered armor and ragged clothing are the general fair of most conscripts, brigands and the occasional down on their luck Freemen. This type of armor provides the wearer with the armor rating of the base item -2 (min 1 if applicable). Battered armor and ragged clothing can be repaired to being Tarnished or Crude, on a successful Challenging craft check with the applicable skills. Suffering half of your wounds in damage or a Critical hit to the area equipped damages this item into being Cracked or Tattered.
    Price: 1/2 of the base item.
    Weight: 1/2 base item.
  • Tarnished/Crude – Tarnished armor and crude clothing are the general garb for most Freemen, some thralls, and the occasionally unlucky Boendr. This type of armor provides the wearer with the base item’s armor rating -1 (min of 1, if applicable). Suffering 75% of your wounds in damage or a Critical hit to the area equipped damages this item and forces you to roll a d10. On evens it becomes Battered or Ragged, on odds it becomes Cracked or Tattered.
    Price: 3/4 of the base item.
    Weight: Base item weight.
  • Sturdy – Sturdy armor or clothing is made by someone who knows what they’re doing. This type of armor provides the base armor rating of the item in question. Suffering 75% of your wounds in damage or a critical hit to the area equipped damages the item and forces you to roll a d10. On 1-8 it becomes Tarnished or Crude. On 9 it becomes Battered or Ragged. On a 10, it becomes Cracked or Tattered. An item that was formerly Sturdy can be repaired, provided it does not become worse than Battered or Ragged.
    Price: Base Cost.
    Weight: Base item weight.
  • Thick – Thick clothing or armor is never made out of metal, though a metal item can be crafted to have Thick clothing lining it. Thick clothing gives the wearer an additional 1 to their armor rating to a single part of the body, and provided the piece of armor that has the Thick quality is the Torso or legs, the character is counted as having winterized clothing on Outdoor Survival checks dealing with cold weather. If the Thick clothing is lining another item it is destroyed if the other piece of armor becomes anything less than Tarnished or Crude. On its own, suffering 75% of your wounds or a critical hit to the area equipped causes you to roll 1d10. On a 1-9 it becomes Tarnished or Crude, on a 10 it becomes Battered or Ragged.
    Price: Base Cost + 1/4th of Base Cost.
    Weight: Base item weight + 3 lbs.
  • Hardened – Hardened armor is never made out of cloth or metal, it refers specifically to leather. Hardened leather counts as having +2 armor against Ballistic Attacks to the area of the body it covers. This armor is just as easily destroyed by melee attacks as anything else. Suffering 50% of your wounds in melee or a critical hit across the area where the item is equipped in melee or ranged combat causes you to roll a 1d10. On 1-5 the item is salvageable (Requiring a Routine Craft check to fix) but gives no Armor until repaired, on 5-8 it becomes Crude or Tarnished, on 9-10 it becomes Cracked or Tattered.
    Price: Base Cost + 3/4th of Base Cost.
    Weight: Base item weight + 5 lbs.
  • Reinforced – Reinforced armor is generally leather armor with metal plates or chainmail reinforcing it, or chainmail with leather and cloth reinforcing it. Reinforced armor gives the base item’s armor rating +3 to the specific area of the body it covers. Reinforced armor can be destroyed by suffering 75% of your wounds in melee combat or a critical hit over the part of the body it protects. If either occurs, roll 1d10, on an 8 or higher the item is Tarnished. An item that was formerly Reinforced can be repaired, provided it does not become worse than Battered or Ragged.
    Price: Base Cost x2.
    Weight: Base item weight + 3lbs per point of Armor.
  • Lordly – Lordly armor or clothing is a sight to behold. It is generally fashioned only from the finest of materials. Lordly armor can have up to an additional third of the armor points its base armor has. Lordly armor can be damaged if you suffer a critical hit on the part of the body which the armor protects. If this is the case, roll 1d10. On a 10, the armor becomes Tarnished, but cannot deplete in quality unless by deliberate action by its owner. Tarnished Lordly armor can be repaired for 1/2 the item’s cost. Lordly Armor also increases your Fame by + 1 for gauntlets, + 2 for a helmet or greaves, and + 3 for torso armor if it was forged for you, or + 5 per piece if it was a previously forgotten artifact.
    Price: Base Cost x10 + 1d100 + 25 gold for each point of armor, Must be done by a Master of the Craft, must be designed and made of rare materials.
    Weight: Base item weight + 2lbs per point of Armor.

Consumables
Food and Drink Qualities from Worst to Best:

  • Stagnant/Rotten – This drink is old and filled with animalcules which cause illness, while this food is clearly ripe, stinking and filled with worms and parasites. Consuming Stagnant Liquid and Rotten Food provides you with a meal’s worth of food and drink but causes you to roll a Resist Disease check. Failing the check means you’ve gotten sick from eating the meal and gained a Disease.
    Price: 1/10th base cost. Can usually be found for free.
  • Boring/Poor – The water is a bit gritty and the food is likely rough bread, gruel, and old mangy cabbage. If alcohol is involved it’s watered down and strong smelling, but the content is too low to give you a good buzz. It gives you a meal’s worth of food, but there’s a chance you ate something foul that got in there somehow. If you eat a poor meal, roll 1d10, on an 8-10, roll a Resist Disease check. If you fail the check you gain a disease.
    Price: Base cost. Cheaper to make than to buy.
  • Decent/Average – The water is fine, the food could be worse. Bread, cheese, maybe some ale or some meat stew with vegetables. There’s even a chance of some pie or dessert with it being included. This will get you through a meal and a half.
    Price: Base cost + 10cp.
  • Good/Bountiful – The drink is delightful, the food plentiful and hearty. Plenty of mead, meats, cheeses, soups, pastries, and even a cake. A feast for most folk and generally a weekly meal for all rich Boendr. Buying a bountiful meal in a tavern or inn house will give you + 1 to your Fame, though it’s generally considered a nice thing to inform the work staff first so that they might prepare higher quality food. Eating a a complete Bountiful meal is practically a human impossibility, but a Thurnskine can do it. A Bountiful meal counts as a day’s worth of food and drink.
    Price: Base Cost + 18sp.

Item Quality

Sword of the North TheCommander